Captive Insurance Unleashes the Power of Cooperation for Greater Efficiency

Efficiency has become something of a buzz word in the business world today. Companies are looking to get more efficient, and even some industries are trying to maximize their efficiency in order to survive in changing markets. Efficiency ultimately means getting more for less, and this is easier said than done. One of the ways that many firms and entire industries have been able to gain efficiency, though, is through cooperation. When industries know that all players need to cut down on costs in order for each to succeed, this breed an environment where cooperation is more than necessary. It’s why some industries have such good information sharing. It’s also why captive insurance is so appealing.

The captive insurance industry offers something revolution to companies that are tired of just cutting a check every month to their insurance provider. Namely, it provides the opportunity to cooperate and take ownership. The model is relatively simple. Rather than companies paying their premiums to an insurance provider, they pool their money with other industry partners and take control of their own insurance. They basically form an insurance collective. Not only do companies get the necessary insurance out of this, but they also receive a cut of the profits at the same time.

This brings companies back to the original purpose of insurance in the first place. Insurance was first developed because the old shipping industries were so volatile. Companies and countries were shipping things across the globe to facilitate commerce, but they could lose their entire load to pirates or storms or other unanticipated problems. The world of commerce could only work if people pooled their risk and came up with an insurance scheme. Over time, traditional insurance has been perverted in some ways. Rather than allowing people to pool risk in order to keep industries afloat, the insurance world is rife with providers that look to make big profits by not providing what they advertise.

Captive insurance is different. Companies become their own insurance provider. It’s a means of self-insurance that cuts out the middle man, allowing companies to keep more of their profits and become more efficient. It makes sense, too. For instance, if a group of lawyers wanted to combine to insure themselves together, who knows more about the risks and costs of the legal industry than them? Captive insurance gives the power back to the companies.